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Jarrah Eucalyptus marginata

RED GUM ONCE USED FOR RAILROAD TIES
Jarrah is strong and naturally durable, so much so that it used to be employed in railroad building for ties. It grows only in a narrow strip along the west coast of Australia south of Perth, and is used locally for anything from house building to the making of fine furniture.

KEY CHARACTERISTICS
Type Temperate hardwood
Other names Western Australian mahogany
Alternatives Purpleheart(Peltogyne paniculata) Sources Western Australia
Color Rich red or reddish brown, varying from medium to dark; any red tends to darken to brown with age. Can be flecked with small stains for a mottled effect.
Texture Moderate to coarse
Grain Straight, but with some wave, and can be interlocking. Hardness Hard
Weight Heavy, but varies (50 lb./cu. ft.) (800 kg/cu. m)
Strength Strong, but not ideal for bending unless grain is straight.
Seasoning and stability Best air-dried initially, as jarrah can warp in the kiln.
Wastage Moderate, mainly because you have to watch out for occasional gum pockets, which can be used as a feature.
Range of board widths Good
Range of board thicknesses Good where stock is readily available
Durability Good

VARIATIONS
Jarrah burl is very popular for turning and carving, as it has good color and a texture that suggests a degree of softness, even though the wood is actually hard. Quartersawn cuts sometimes reveal mottled rays.

SUSTAINABILITY
Not listed as vulnerable, but there is little evidence of certified jarrah supplies.

AVAILABILITY AND COST
Jarrah isn't common in North America, but when it can be found the stocks should be good and the price somewhere between expensive and moderate.




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Updated: 12/2017   copyright 2011 Rowecraft