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Longleaf Pine Pinus palustris

STRIPY SOFTWOOD THAT IS SOFT AND HARD
The most distinctive feature of the group of species that longleaf pine belongs to (others listed below) is also the cause of their most significant weakness. The contrast between the pale earlywood and the darker, orange-red latewood can make planing by hand or machine challenging. It is grown across the southern United States and is generally used for utility purposes because it is relatively strong and has a high resin content.

KEY CHARACTERISTICS
Type Temperate softwood
Other names Southern yellow pine, yellow pine, longleaf yellow pine, Georgia pine
Similar species P. elliottii, shortleaf pine (P. echinata), loblolly pine (P. taeda), Caribbean pitch pine (P. caribaea and P. oocarpa)
Alternatives Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)
Sources Southern United States
Color Pale yellow-cream earlywood and darker reddish orange latewood
Texture Medium
Grain Straight
Hardness Moderate
Weight Medium to heavy (42 lb./cu. ft.) (670 kg/cu. m)
Strength Good, but not for bending, as the resin protects the fibers from the softening effects of steam
Seasoning and stability Easy to season quickly, with little movement once dry
Wastage Low; few knots to worry about
Range of board widths Good
Range of board thicknesses Good
Durability Moderately resistant to decay, but prone to insect attack

VARIATIONS
Quartersawn sides have parallel lines, with flame shapes on the plain-sawn faces.

SUSTAINABILITY
No problems with sustainability. Certified supplies are readily available.

AVAILABILITY AND COST
Widely available and not expensive.




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Updated: 12/2017   copyright 2011 Rowecraft